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Tips On How To Ace The LSAT!

Tips On How To Ace The LSAT!

LSAT stands for Law School Admission Test in full and it is seen as an essential part of being admitted into a prestigious law school. This test is designed to test a student’s ability to excel at the law school and so it does not just test what the student has already learned. Due to this narrowed down focus, the LSAT is therefore very different from all other standardized exams which students take while in high school or even college. The unique nature of LSAT prep requires that the student clearly understands not only the format but also the nature of questions which are likely to be asked.

FORMAT OF THE LSAT PREP

The LSAT prep is usually divided into five main sections:

  • A writing section.
  • Two logical reasoning questions.
  • Reading comprehension.
  • Analytical reasoning.

The writing section never really has a score, but then it is given to every law school where any given student would apply. All the other sections have a duration of 35 minutes each and usually contain an average of 24 to 28 questions.

Due to the fact that the Logical Reasoning Questions sections are two, this portion of the exam then carries a lot of weight. It carries fifty percent of the exam’s overall score. Generally, these sections test the student’s ability to criticize and analyze arguments which are presented to him. When it comes to the section of the analytical reasoning, there are four logic games whose purpose is to test the student’s ability to comprehend structures of more complex relationships.

The section of Reading Comprehension encompasses what is usually on all other standardized tests. This section simply requires a student to comprehend what he has read in the specific time he is given. Even though the highest score for the exam is 180, a person who gets 170 points is usually graded at the 98th percentile. Since the LSAT prep is seen by most law schools as being the most accurate unit for testing a student’s ability to do well in the laws schools, it has a lot of weight especially when it comes to the application process. Officials who conduct the admission process have expressed concerns that excellent performance in the undergraduate classes may not really correlate to excellent performance in law school, hence the need for the LSAT prep.

IMPORTANT TIPS TO NOTE WHEN TAKING YOUR LSAT

  • Sir Andrew Brody, the content director for the LSAT prep, compared preparing for the exam to preparing for a marathon. He encouraged students to constantly keep the minds sharp always. This means that a scholar who is about to take the LSAT prep should start preparing weeks before the actual test as compared to cramming everything the last minute.
  • Secondly, as much as having a study partner is essential in all aspects of education, preparing for the LSAT more often than not requires you study alone so as to understand your strongholds. This is because the test exposes the student’s weaknesses and strengths more precisely as compared to other standardized tests. The questions are usually analytic in nature and therefore whatever may be a challenge to one person may be a walkover to another student. Studying in groups may be detrimental in that this may make the student portray the test in a general manner instead of focusing on the student’s own specific weaknesses.
  • Rather that carrying all of your notes and study materials wherever you go, download an LSAT prep app on your smartphone. It’s the most convenient way to study on-the-go, because all of your study material is right on your phone. (Apps even have discounts codes and coupons!)
  • The LSAT has an unfamiliar nature and so it is also advised to practice the LSAT questions regularly so as to get used to the format. However, practice alone is not enough. Take time to tabulate and analyze your results. Look keenly into the questions you got wrong and discern the reason for the failure.
  • Work on your critical thinking. Since the LSAT does not necessarily test on what was learned in class, you are advised to take classes in critical writing or logic. This enables the student to critically analyze the theories in the LSAT and also present ideas in the texts.
  • Answer all questions. In LSAT, no penalties are given for incorrect answers, therefore, it is important to attempt each question so as to boost your chances of getting higher points. Furthermore, you can just start with the easier questions first, then revisit the harder ones later on. Another key factor is that the student should also know what sections have easier questions. Questions in the section of the reading comprehension and analytical reasoning have a tendency to get harder with time. However, the sections definitely get easier towards the end.
Aidan

The author Aidan